Chinese Internet Giant Baidu Prepares to Launch First Self-Driving Passenger Bus

Chinese Internet Giant Baidu Prepares to Launch First Self-Driving Passenger Bus

Chinese transit systems will be getting an expensive facelift as internet search provider Baidu plans to fully integrate the country’s first autonomous passenger bus in 2021, and hopefully in 2018, have one out on the road.

The bus itself will follow a predetermined route, but in which city it will be traveling remains a mystery. Baidu has partnered with BAIC Motor Corp. to work out the kinks in these details and ensure that the bus safely makes it from point A to point B.

The project of course doesn’t come without price; it’s been reported that the company has spent 15 percent of their annual revenue to self-driving research, which includes the development of their line of driverless cars, also scheduled for a 2021 release.

Self-driving bus technology will offer commuters a wide range of benefits, one of the most important being that their implementation will help to decrease the number of traffic-based fatalities caused by human error. Autonomous passenger buses, like the ones sanctioned by Baidu, will also be able to transport more people than a taxi or car on a fixed route.

The environmental benefits of self-driving bus features are incredible. With more autonomous buses replacing regular cars, there will be a decrease in the amount of greenhouse gas emitted into the atmosphere, which will improve quality of life for everyone.

This research isn’t just limited to China; the driverless auto phenomenon is trending in other parts of the world too, like Germany, where the state-owned rail company Deutsche Bahn began testing driverless shuttle buses in a spa town near the southeastern state of Bavaria, and in Australia, where the results of the RAC’s automated bus trial in South Perth returned favorable.

Passenger buses are making a comeback in a big way. Hop on the trend with us at Las Vegas Bus Sales and discover what benefits await you and your passenger commute.

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